Book Review: God – Challenges from Philosophy and Science

We had our external reviewer Chris do another review for us since we are super busy organizing a readathon! This time, he reviewed the book God: Challenges from Philosophy and Science by Lynne Renoir. Check out his review below to see what he thought!

Synopsis: Philosopher Lynne Renoir questions the traditional view of God as an all powerful being who created the universe and governs it according to his will. She argues that such an idea can be challenged philosophically, and that it does not accord with discoveries in modern science. On the other hand, she suggests, it is evident that experiences of transformation can occur in the lives of individuals who wholeheartedly embrace religious beliefs. Her book explores possible explanations for this situation by proposing that truth is found in the inner dimensions of a person’s being, and is not something that can be imposed from an external source. Renoir’s work was the result of her own difficulties in experiencing the transformation she sought through her Christian faith, and followed years of research undertaken in the areas of philosophy, science, and psychology.

This book has three main parts: God and Philosophy, God and Science, God and Belief. 

The first section of this book discussed the thinking of some philosophers who use their differing experiences of the divine as a means of arguing for his existence.

When authors write they usually have an audience in mind. Here, it is difficult to ascertain the audience the author means to reach. This isn’t a book for beginners or for those who wish to learn more about philosophy, or what a particular philosopher thinks. For example, you will not learn David Hume’s great contributions to philosophy or the things for which he is best known. You will learn a small portion of his thoughts about the divine—and even in that category you won’t learn the context of his views. 

Each chapter in the first part stands alone. Chapters don’t build upon the previous chapter. You can read the chapters in any order and not get lost, providing you already have a good background in philosophy. The recitation of information tends towards the academic—concise writing, but unfortunately, this makes it dry reading. 

All of this makes the first part of the book seem like an introductory section of a PhD thesis. Such a format does not engage readers. Engaging the reader requires the author tell them why they should care what these different philosophers think. Show how these ideas are relevant to current societal ideas, or how philosophy changed society or how philosophy mirrored the changes in society. 

The second part, God and Science, is more readable. It starts in the sciences and ends in an overview of three main religions. The concise academic writing works in this section. It shows the weirdness of quantum physics or the big bang in just a few paragraphs (although the incorrect assertion that the big bang is an explosion is a wrong analogy that scientists have been correcting for decades). Like the first section, Renoir highlights different scientists to show their views on a variety of subjects (e.g., consciousness). 

However, Renoir applies philosophy “rules” to science. In philosophy, one opinion is as good as another (broadly speaking). In science, you pay more attention to an expert in the subject matter rather than an equally brilliant scientist who doesn’t study that subject. E.g., Neil deGrasse Tyson’s thoughts on physics are not controversial whereas his thoughts on biology are often wrong at a high school level.

So, in the section on consciousness, Renoir mainly quotes scientists and mystics who lack background in the field of consciousness or lack background in science. Their opinions, regardless of their expertise in a different field, are meaningless from a scientific viewpoint. Being unable to recognize relevant expertise leads Renoir to incorrectly write, “In modern Western thought, the scientific understanding of the universe as conscious has arisen mainly as a result of quantum discoveries”. 

No. It hasn’t. There is no “scientific understanding of the universe as conscious”. Quoting philosophical ideas from non-philosopher scientists and quoting scientific ideas from non-scientist philosophers does not make a “scientific understanding”. That’s not how science works.

Renoir’s thinking that philosophy and science have interchangeable standards continues to mislead her, as in “The idea that the universe if conscious creates problems both for believers in a personal God and for those who deny the existence of the divine”. 

Again, no, it does not create a problem. The idea of a conscious universe is a philosophical concept, not a scientific concept. There’s no chain of scientific evidence that leads you to conclude the universe must be conscious; thus, you can solve the problem by rejecting the idea of conscious universe, or by devising philosophical work-arounds (which is what many philosophical ideas are). 

The third part is God and Belief. This section looks at “mystical experiences from the point of view of the physiological changes involved”. I found this section had similar problems to the previous section, where people are quoted regarding things that are outside of their field of expertise. Still, it is interesting reading, such as Chapter 12 on religious experiences and transcendence. 

As with the other parts, the topics covered are brief outlines. Anyone interested in these things can find entire books written for a lay audience on these topics. 

In the end, I can’t say I liked this book. In the philosophical places I wanted more information to put the ideas into context. In the science section I found the blurring of the rules for philosophy and science aggravating. In the final section it felt like getting a few carrot sticks rather than the full meal you wanted. 

Each section could have been expanded and made a book in its own right. Putting it together as one book meant far too much had to be left out, and what was left in required a more in-depth knowledge of philosophy and physics than the average reader possesses. 

From a scholarly work probably 3.5-4/5 stars. As a book to communicate your ideas to the world at large 1/5 stars.

Book Rating: 1/5

You can buy this book on Amazon and find it on Goodreads.

Disclaimer: This book was sent to us by the author in ebook format to read and give an honest review.




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Thank you so much to Culture Carton who sent me a complimentary subscription box to do an unboxing on my channel! It has a lot of cool stuff in it! Let me know in the comments what your favorite item was! Check out the video below:

Author Interview: TJ Eckhart

I recently was on a book tour for TJ Eckhart’s book, True You 101 and today I have an author interview with her! But first, here is a little about her book!

Synopsis: If one class during high school could help you become the person you were meant to be, would you take it? At the Reinholdt Institute of Sortilege Arts, sophomores are required to take True You 101 no matter whether they live in the mortal or magical realm. Over the course of a year, each student must confront all possibilities until their outer form matches their inner self. Blake Trudeau has always just wanted to be normal and hopes the class will make that a reality, but will the final spell conjure Blake’s fondest wishes or worst nightmares?

Link: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1950502317/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_hsch_vapi_tpbk_p1_i0

And now on to the interview!

1. What is your top read of 2020 so far? 

According to my Goodreads list of reviews from this year, there are several books that I’ve given 5 stars to. Of those, it is hard to pick a favorite, but I’ll go with Kindred: A Graphic Novel Adaptation because I am a huge Octavia Butler fan and I am a picky fan of some graphic novels and this aligned on both fronts for me back in February 2020.

2. What is your favorite book friendship? 

Maybe it’s a factor of the types of books that I’m attracted to reading, but friends are generally not as much of a draw as family or partners are for me. The Silver Metal Lover by Tanith Lee had both a strong pair bond as well as strangely odd yet ultimately positive friendships.

3. Most anticipated book release of 2021? 

Since I don’t have a book set to release in 2021 (yet), I don’t really follow when books are set to release months in advance. I might learn about a new book coming out from an author I love a month or so before it releases, but I’m not enough of a part of big publishing to really be in the know about forthcoming books. As a book reviewer, I have to stay pretty open to what I might be sent or offered. I’m also exceedingly picky about what I buy for myself simply because between writing myself and reviewing, I don’t get a lot of free reading time.

4. How many books are in your TBR Pile? 

I have two bookshelves of books to be read.

Those that I’ve been sent to review. Currently at 28 physical books. (This is why I can’t accept digital books for review)

Those I have for pleasure to read. Currently at 26 physical books.

5. Who is your favorite author? 

It is still Octavia Butler. She was willing to write honestly about race, gender, sexism, classism, violence, religion, abuse, history, and she thought big with her character and world building. I cried when she died; I rarely cry at death, even of family.

6. How did you start writing? 

My mother was a writer, though other than church bulletins, she didn’t try to get published for most of her life. She was very physically ill for long periods, but she could read to me and encourage me to write. 

7. Where is your favorite reading spot? 

I like my couch because I have back support and a comfortable seat. Sitting at the dining room table also works especially if it is non-fiction that I’m reading because I like to still take notes even though I’m not in school.

8. How long have you been an author? 

Depends on if being an author means getting paid or not, and if anyone other than your teacher or your parent read it.

The first story of mine that I’ve found in a scrapbook that my mother made of my childhood, was from kindergarten. 

The first story I had published (but wasn’t paid for) was a school project in 3rd grade. 

The first story I was paid for that appeared in an anthology, was in 1995. Since then, I’ve been paid for my writing at least once every three years or so. It really depended on how I was doing in my academic career and where I was living.

9. What do you like about reading? 

Reading is comfort food for me because it reminds me of the close tie I could have with my mother when I was growing up. It was also a way to escape from the less positive times with my mother. 

10. If you had to describe yourself in a book title, what would it be?

Oh! That’s a unique question! I’m going to say… Complexity is the Color of Her Mind

A skilled storyteller, Eckhart enjoys reading her fiction to live audience so she is happy to travel in her region to perform readings, sell/sign books, and lead workshops and discussions on various aspects of BDSM, gender & sexuality, or the literature, culture, and study of science fiction, fantasy, horror and other types of speculative fiction. She loves visiting with conventions and private organizations though she must consider financial matters when making such plans. 

That’s it for the author interview! Thank you to Tammy for joining in on this fun post an being a part of it!


NEW BOOK OUT – ACORNS & ROOTS

An indestructible object full of strong magic, tempting the darkest of souls. Rare rainbow roots that are sold for a high price in the city, offering a young man a way to pay rent as he faces eviction. The secret to taking down a corrupt king and avoiding disenchantment, if a young Pixie succeeds in reaching her destination.

It is believed that all of these things can be found in the Valley, accessed through an Enchanted Forest that is struggling to survive against a dark magic- harnessing monarchy. A rebellion is stirring, and when Forest Pixie Fillii falls from a tree, landing directly on top of unemployed Amer (who doesn’t believe in things like Enchanted Forests), their journeys and worlds literally collide.

With vastly different yet strangely similar backgrounds and experiences, Fillii and Amer must both decide whether they can afford to trust each other, and what is worth fighting for.

Joined by magical creatures such as Elves and a Caribou army, Fillii and Amer find themselves in the midst of an epic battle of survival, old magic, and secrets carved in stone.

About the Author

Megs Calleja is a Canadian writer and actor, whose professional screenwriting has aired with TELUS and The CW. A member of the Playwrights Guild of Canada, Megs is inspired by magical wardrobes, shooting stars, marmalade on toast, and dancing in the rain. This is her first novel.

Buy the book here: https://www.amazon.ca/Acorns-Roots-Megs-Calleja/dp/1525561170/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=acorns+%26+roots&qid=1605223167&sr=8-1



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Hey Bookworms!! I did an unboxing of October’s Queer Book Box which was sent to me in exchange for an unboxing video on the channel so I hope you enjoy it! I also did a mini haul at the end of some books I picked up recently so stay tuned until the end to find out what I got! Let me know what you think of the box in the comments below. Check out the video below:

Book Spotlight: Median Gray

Welcome to the blog tour for gritty crime thriller, Median Gray by Bill Mesce Jr.

41Ptfp6kpBLMedian Gray

Publication Date: August 4th, 2020

Genre: Thriller/ Crime Thriller/ Police Procedural

Publisher: Willow River Press

“Smart, gritty, and authentic, Median Gray delivers a crackling tale complete with complex and damaged characters, and a keen eye for what cops know and think.” -– SFPD Sgt. Adam Plantinga, author of 400 Things Cops Know and Police Craft.

At a time when New York’s mean streets were their meanest, one NYPD detective at the end of his career takes one last chance to correct a 20-year-old injustice, and another cop at the beginning of his career tries to stop him before a police department already scarred by corruption investigations takes another hit.

“Mesce takes you on a blistering ride-along down mean New York streets with the most irreverent detectives this side of Richard Price.  And with dialogue so true it feels wire-tapped; Price had better watch his back.  This one’s a winner.”  –David Breckman, co-executive producer of TV’s Monk and The Good Cop

Add to Goodreads

Available on Amazon!

About the Author

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Bill Mesce, Jr. is an author, screenwriter, and playwright living in New Jersey.

His first professional writing gig was the product of a screenwriting contest landing him an uncredited stint on Brian DePalma’s 1981 political thriller, BLOW OUT. Since then he has worked on a number of film projects, including the 1998 feature ROAD ENDS which was screened at a number film festivals.

Another writing contest led to his award-winning one-act play “A Good Kid,” which, in turn kicked off a series of related one-acts which were eventually rolled into his first full-length stage effort, A JERSEY CANTATA.

And yet again, a writing contest brought him his first published credit, the critically-acclaimed WW II drama, THE ADVOCATE. Since then, he has turned out a range of work from academic studies to literary short fiction and including several well-received sequels to THE ADVOCATE.

From 2010 to 2017, he was an adjunct instructor at several colleges and universities in New Jersey. He now teaches screenwriting at the University of Maine at Farmington.

Willow River Press

Median Gray

Blog Tour Schedule

September 14th

Reads & Reels (Spotlight) http://readsandreels.com

Kim Knight (Spotlight) http://kimknightauthor.wordpress.com

PoptheButterfly Blog (Spotlight) https://popthebutterfly.wordpress.com

Cocktails & Fairy Tales (Spotlight) https://www.facebook.com/CocktailsFairytales

September 15th

The Magic of Wor(l)ds (Spotlight) http://themagicofworlds.wordpress.com

Rambling Mads (Review) http://ramblingmads.com

The Faerie Review (Review) http://www.thefaeriereview.com

September 16th

B is for Book Review (Spotlight) https://bforbookreview.wordpress.com

Breakeven Books (Spotlight) https://breakevenbooks.com

Jessica Belmont (Review) https://jessicabelmont.wordpress.com/

September 17th

Tsarina Press (Spotlight) https://www.tsarinapress.com

@burlingtonbibliophagist (Review) https://www.instagram.com/p/CC6Qy6yABBJ/?igshid=1gadff8igjmwv

@the.b00kreader (Review)   https://www.instagram.com/the.b00kreader

September 18th

Read & Rated (Spotlight) https://readandrated.com/

Inked & Blonde (Review) https://inkedandblonde.blogspot.com/

Stine Writing (Review) https://christinebialczak.com/

Blog Tour Organized By:

R&R Button



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I once again make an attempt at doing a weekly reading vlog! I clearly need more practice with these but hopefully, you enjoy this video of me being chaotic. Let me know how you do you reading vlogs in the comments down below! Check out the video below:

Book Review: Sparrow in the Mirror

Chris is back at it again with more reviews coming your way. He has also been working hard on his new blog This & That Books which you should go check out. This time, he read Sparrow in the Mirror by Kunal Narayan Uniyal.

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Look at that composited artwork on the cover, a bird with birds within it, fading at a wingtip into dark vagueness, smaller version trailing along like an image echo. This is a cover of a book of poems. To me, the cover reflects the poems within this book.

Like the birds within the birds, there are definite themes that reoccur and are layered such as the ones on spirituality and religion. Hindu religion and the Veddas, Christianity and the Bible, mixing of both together. There are the themes on life, on pain, on suffering, on death, on redemption, on egos, of the release that lies beyond death, on love, on the transience of life and our works. At times the words are stark with only one meaning, other times they fade into the dark like the wingtip on the cover, leaving you to fill in meaning from your own experience, making the poems more personal to you.

From a technical standpoint, rhythm varies, is free-verse at times, mixed with a rhyming couplet that emphasizes points. Some lines stand almost in contrapuntal harmony with two melodies being played, but working together in the same song.  The cadence of some of the poems reminded me of songs by Natalie Merchant, e.g., Merchant’s Ophelia with Uniyal’s Maya.

There’s an excellent use of repetition such as you see in poems by T.S. Eliot and Walt Whitman. It can be done throughout the poem such as in Uniyal’s poem Something Is Not Right, where the title is repeated at the end of each verse on separate occasions; or in one line such as this part in the Wheel of Time

Standing in that lonely hall with those words

Resounding hard and hard and hard

I’m alone, came so; will leave the world even so.

Google repetition and T.S. Eliot or repetition in poetry to see how this common poetry device is used to reach the reader.

So, how well did the use of structure, of phrasing, of poetry devices like repetition, of ambiguity, of hidden meanings that echo back upon themselves to produce harmony (like a Bach fugue—which is just a more complicated version of four groups singing Row Row Row Your Boat as a round) come together?

Quite well. Some poems I read several times, I memorized parts that spoke to me. The poem Mother made my eyes sting a bit (“I’m not crying, you’re crying!”).

The Wheel of Time,

I try creating my life, new structures of delight,

But alas! With my return, all are turned into rubbles

Worth not a single dime.

Who created it, which destroyed my vast stride,

My ego or the wheel of time?

reminded me of Ozymandias by Percy Bysshe Shelley where the following words are carved into a base of a crumbled decaying giant statue that once would have been awe and fear-inspiring, but now turned into rubble.

My name is Ozymandias, King of Kings;

Look on my Works, ye Mighty, and despair!

We read this Bysshe poem in middle school and it almost precipitated an existential crisis in me as I realized even great works will erode away, and I, myself, will one day not exist. I had an echo of that feeling with Wheel of Time although in this case I’m fine with one day not existing (but not quite yet please because that TBR pile isn’t going to reduce itself).

Another poem Search of Life was thought-provoking with several meanings built one on top of the other that you’d only see upon subsequent readings.

Other poems, like House, are simple in their meanings, but convey a sorrow of things lost.

Now that the houses are big, hearts are small.

There are rooms everywhere, but hardly a place for all.

Doors are now locked tight, even God

Needs to try hard to squeeze in

Each confined to its own world,

Calling it house which was home before.

The appreciation of poetry is a subjective thing, perhaps far more so than other books. This makes them harder to rate as we each bring our own interpretations to the verses. As mentioned earlier, when we bring in our own interpretations, we bring in part of ourselves into the poetry so that we connect with it. That connection is an indication of poetry done well.

This book of poems connected with me. I think it was done well. I will be rereading many of these poems again. I hope other readers will also find a connection to these poems.

Book Rating: 5/5


In the mood for a fun western story? Check out Billy (The Kid) by Peter Meech and satisfy that craving!

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Pueblo, Colorado,1932. Bootleggers thrive in a town where the sheriff is on the take and you can kill a man with impunity. In this thrilling narrative, a once-famous outlaw finds himself thrust into the middle of a bootleg war against his will. At stake is nothing less than the life of his best friend and his last chance at true love with the town beauty. But is the legendary gunman who he claims to be, or is he just a retired dentist with a vivid imagination? Peter Meech reimagines the figure of Billy the Kid in a remarkable story told with verve, humor, grit and grace.

About the author: Peter Meech is an author, screenwriter, director and producer. He also mugs for the camera on occasion. His website is www.petermeech.com.



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I left my reading fate in my boyfriend’s hands and let him pick all the books I will be reading in June! Check out the video below:

Book Blogger and Booktuber Lists

Hey there bookworms! I just wanted to share with you some resources for finding more book bloggers! It has helped me and I wanted to share so you could submit yourselves to the list if you so desire to do so.

Canadian Book Bloggers

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Book Youtube Channels

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These are just 2 that I am a part of myself but there are many out there to be found! Having your channels and blogs added to lists like these help authors find you if they want to reach out with information about their books.

I have found some great reads due to people finding me through these lists and think that they are fantastic resources. Not to mention, they adds backlinks to your youtube channels and blogs which boosts their SEO (Search Engine Optimization) with Google.

It also helps with finding some other creators close to you if you are looking to do a collaboration project.

Anyways, that is just my two cents on the lists so check them out if you feel like it and have a great day (hopefully reading some good books).


In the mood for a fun western story? Check out Billy (The Kid) by Peter Meech and satisfy that craving!

51ETMw9hcBL._SX322_BO1,204,203,200_

Pueblo, Colorado,1932. Bootleggers thrive in a town where the sheriff is on the take and you can kill a man with impunity. In this thrilling narrative, a once-famous outlaw finds himself thrust into the middle of a bootleg war against his will. At stake is nothing less than the life of his best friend and his last chance at true love with the town beauty. But is the legendary gunman who he claims to be, or is he just a retired dentist with a vivid imagination? Peter Meech reimagines the figure of Billy the Kid in a remarkable story told with verve, humor, grit and grace.

About the author: Peter Meech is an author, screenwriter, director and producer. He also mugs for the camera on occasion. His website is www.petermeech.com.



Thank you to our Patreon Supporters:

Get your name/blog added to our blog posts and Youtube videos by supporting us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/breakevenbooks

I left my reading fate in my boyfriend’s hands and let him pick all the books I will be reading in June! Check out the video below:

Book Review: Social Misfits

Another book from the TBR jar bites the dust! I read Social Misfits by Kelli Nicole and got my fill of the highschool drama.

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Synopsis: Good friends are hard to come by and even harder to keep. C.J. Taylor learned this the hard way when she discovered her best friend had been keeping a secret from her. And it’s kind of awkward. He’s in love with her.

In this coming-of-age story of friendships, first dates, and chick flicks, this publicly accused “tease” is forced to deal with the awkward and often humorous aftermath of rejecting her best friend’s romantic confession. There’s​ ​her (former?) best friend, Presley​, ​who’s​ ​a​ ​total​ ​sweetheart​ ​of​ ​a​ ​jock​ ​but​ ​with​ ​a​ ​dorky charm​ ​that​ ​goes​ ​unnoticed​ ​by​ ​the​ ​female​ ​population,​ ​the​ ​tragically​ ​shy​, ​Cindy,​ ​who​ ​has​ ​a​ ​massive fear​ ​of​ ​boys​ ​and​ ​a​ ​secret​ ​desire​ ​to be noticed,​ ​the​ ​hopeless​ ​anti-social​, ​Hamp,​ ​who’s​ ​deceptively cute​ ​and​ ​is​ ​particularly​ ​allergic​ ​to​ ​all​ ​things​ ​school-related…And​ ​then​ ​there’s​ ​her​ ​mother’s​ ​fiance, Anthony,​ ​who​ ​thinks​ ​her​ ​only​ ​purpose​ ​in​ ​life​ ​is​ ​watching​ ​teen​ soap operas.

But C.J. isn’t ready to give up. Faced with the hopeless reality of her now strained friendship, C.J. is determined to set things right. And she thinks she knows the perfect way get things back on track…she must find him a girlfriend.

I was looking forward to the high school drama aspect of this book because I tend to like those and though it would be fun but this one just didn’t do it for me. I found the main character to be very self-centered (which I think was the point) and kind of annoying.

They were supposed to change throughout the book and learn more about what it means to be a good person and a better friend but it didn’t seem to get to the point where I actually thought they really learned anything.

There were also multiple times that the “R” word was used and I was not a fan of this. Especially because it was used in the send of calling someone “socially r******d” when they author could have used the book’s title, “Social Misfits”, perfect for this case of phrasing.

Some of the drama kept me reading until the end but I would not really recommend the book as it just didn’t have enough substance for me.

Book Rating: 2/5

You can buy this book on Amazon and find it on Goodreads.

Disclaimer: Ths book was sent to me in physical format by the author in exchange for an honest review.


Check out this book called Dork by my author friend Will Winkle about a guy trying to get his crush’s attention while navigating his life as part of a fraternity house!

His book can be found on Amazon, Goodreads, and his website: WillWinkle.com.

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If any of you out there like Brandon Sanderson, then you should check out my latest video. It is a reading vlog of his book Skyward and I had quite a time reading this one!

Book Review: Recursion

Blake Crouch just keeps putting out amazing books! I read Recursion by Blake Crouch and it was magnificent! I don’t have enough great things to say about this author. I think he is now a staple in the sci-fi community.

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Synopsis: Memory makes reality.

That’s what New York City cop Barry Sutton is learning as he investigates the devastating phenomenon the media has dubbed False Memory Syndrome—a mysterious affliction that drives its victims mad with memories of a life they never lived.

That’s what neuroscientist Helena Smith believes. It’s why she’s dedicated her life to creating a technology that will let us preserve our most precious memories. If she succeeds, anyone will be able to re-experience a first kiss, the birth of a child, the final moment with a dying parent. 

As Barry searches for the truth, he comes face-to-face with an opponent more terrifying than any disease—a force that attacks not just our minds but the very fabric of the past. And as its effects begin to unmake the world as we know it, only he and Helena, working together, will stand a chance at defeating it.

But how can they make a stand when reality itself is shifting and crumbling all around them?

This book was a giant mind-bending puzzle. It was so intense and I had such a hard time putting it down. I read it as a buddy read and you better believe that I struggled to keep the same pace as the other readers for this because I had the urge to just read it all in one sitting!

Blake had me with Dark Matter and then he came out with this one and it was amazing. I really enjoyed the dual perspective in this one and how it didn’t really have chapters but kept switching between the two perspectives with time stamps.

This one resonated with me more because it deals with a false memory syndrome so naturally, they are working towards cures for Alzheimer’s disease. I have been personally affected by this disease, having to watch my grandmother deteriorate from it. So when I read anything that is working towards combatting such an awful thing, it has a big impact on me and I feel fully invested in it.

There were so many twists and turns in this book and I find myself still thinking about it even though I finished it a while back. It gave me Edge of Tomorrow vibes with a little bit of The Butterfly Effect thrown in. It is definitely one of those books that stick with you and Blake Crouch has become an auto-buy author for me now.

I strongly recommend this book to anyone that wants to go for a hell of a ride! I don’t think you will be disappointed. You can expect action, adventure, love, and a lot of character growth. They have to battle with so many moral decisions that could change everything.

Book Rating: 5/5

You can buy this book on Amazon and find it on Goodreads.

Disclaimer: I was given this book as a gift and read it because I wanted to. I was in no way compensated for this honest review.



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Book Review: Dork

Can’t come out tonight? Why? Because I am all booked up! I am busy reading Dork by Will Winkle.

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Synopsis: Ray Cooper is graduating from college and doesn’t know what he wants to do with his life – stop me if you’ve heard this before. Besides his impending graduation, Coop also has the problem of trying to start a new relationship in the shadow of his last one. Plus, his term project is due in two weeks. He’s also losing his hair. Alright, he has a few problems. Over a weekend, Ray attends the birthday party of a girl he isn’t sure if he knows, meets odd people at bars, and looks forward to the last hurrah he and his friends have planned for Saturday when the local bars are offering discounts to anyone with wristbands sold for charity. There’s no way any of this could go wrong.

This book was half and half for me because I am a very plot-driven person when it comes to books and this one was kind of lacking in the plot department. However, its main protagonist was very humorous and a lot of thought was put into his character which evened out the playing field.

I also enjoyed that they had little footnotes at the bottom of some pages to kind of break the fourth wall and add little funny descriptors that lightened up the mood of the book and from time to time brought a smile to my face. I will say that footnotes are not for everyone and know that they bring some people out of the story but I think they complimented this one well considering there was not much plot to follow.

It also gave me a bit of nostalgia for my college days when I would go to parties and drink on the weekends (a lot more than I do now). Some of the routines the people had in this book as college students were spot on. And yes, we Canadians do call Mcdonalds “Don’s”.

Imagine having a guy carry around a camera in a fraternity house all day and then show you that movie. This book would be that end result. You will see the life of a college student and get some laughs out of it (including his struggles of trying to get the girl).

Book Rating: 3/5

You can buy this book on Amazon and find it on Goodreads.

Disclaimer: This book was sent to me in an ebook format by the author to read and give my honest review.



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Time to show off what I am reading in March!! I’m getting more ambitious each month. Soon I will be reading 10 books a month (haha yea right). What are you guys reading?

Book Review: Infinity Son

Hey you! Yea you, bookworm over there. Guess what? I read another book. It was the one, the only, most anticipated Infinity Son by Adam Silvera. And now I am going to tell you about it.

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Synopsis: Growing up in New York, brothers Emil and Brighton always idolized the Spell Walkers—a vigilante group sworn to rid the world of specters. While the Spell Walkers and other celestials are born with powers, specters take them, violently stealing the essence of endangered magical creatures.

Brighton wishes he had a power so he could join the fray. Emil just wants the fighting to stop. The cycle of violence has taken a toll, making it harder for anyone with a power to live peacefully and openly. In this climate of fear, a gang of specters has been growing bolder by the day.

Then, in a brawl after a protest, Emil manifests a power of his own—one that puts him right at the heart of the conflict and sets him up to be the heroic Spell Walker Brighton always wanted to be.

Brotherhood, love, and loyalty will be put to the test, and no one will escape the fight unscathed.

I was a little wary going into this book because I know that Adam Silvera has been primarily a contemporary author and this was his first foray into the fantasy genre. I will say that he could use a little bit of work on his world-building because at times it felt a little rushed and thrown together when it could have used a little bit more explanation into the backstory and how characters/the world came to be in the state that it is in.

That being said, I really liked his character dialogue and interactions with each other (which probably spurs from his contemporary writing) and the feeling he put into them. I liked that things were relatable like Brighton and his Youtube channel (I also have a channel and work hard at it).

The whole power dynamic was fascinating to learn about and I thought it was very cool that they had different ways to acquire these powers. The battles were descriptive enough that they were easy for me to imagine and I felt like I was right there in the thick of it with Emil and Brighton.

I think the superhero nerd inside of me was excited to have a new take on the genre and loved it. Plus, that ending left me wanting more! it kind of sucks that this just came out because I need that next one to know what happens.

All in all, I would recommend this book if you want a new take on superpowers that ties it into the modern world and feels like it could be real.

Book Rating: 4/5

You can buy this book on Amazon and find it on Goodreads.

Disclaimer: This book was sent to me by Harper Collins Canada as a physical format ARC to read and give my honest review.



Thank you to our Patreon Supporters:

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This video was so much fun to film! It’s the book version of “Kiss, Marry, Kill”. If you haven’t done this yet, I suggest you try. It was hard! So many books I love. It was like The Hunger Games book edition LOL. 

Book Review: Lucky Star

Our external reviewer Sara sent in another review. She works at a library so she is always surrounded by books (that’s the dream) and then keeps on reading books for fun at home in her free time. She also is very passionate about her yarn creature creations which you can find at AdorkableLilCrafties. Anyways, the book she reviewed was Lucky Star by Holly Curtis.

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Synopsis: Teenager Ben Somerset has three great loves in his life: Sherlock Holmes, designer clothes and a certain song by Madonna. And then Susie appears.

Set in England in 1984 Lucky Star tells of Ben’s introduction to the world of shoplifting, music, politics, love and heartbreak.

This book was pretty awesome. It was sweet, authentic, engaging, and new. If you like coming-of-age novels, like those by John Green, I think you’d enjoy this.

Curtis does an excellent job of portraying a teenage boy in a way that felt so real, I was shocked to learn that the author was a woman. It felt like the perfect snapshot into a teenage boy in England in the 80s.

There’s angst, teenage antics, too-real anxiety and depression, and all in such a natural way it felt like really reading his diary. I wasn’t really sure where this book was heading when I began it, as the characters were kind of little prats; I soon realized this was the point, and I enjoyed getting to read about them growing and learning about themselves in a natural way.

The character development and plot progression felt natural and entertaining, and I was definitely engaged in where the story was going. Our narrator, Ben, took us through summer in England for a group of delinquent youths, while they tried to figure out what to do with their lives after school.

If you enjoy realistic coming-of-age novels, I think any reader would find it surprisingly easy to relate to this character, as he navigates finding himself and where he fits in in his town, including brief snapshots into what it’s like to have anxiety, without it being the focus of the novel or a deterrent to readers who aren’t comfortable discussing mental health.

Holly Curtis did an excellent job, and I was amused to read along with Ben, following his journey and learning about what it might be like to be an English teenage boy.

Book Rating: 5/5

You can buy this book on Amazon and find it on Goodreads.

Disclaimer: This book was sent to us in an e-book format by the author to read and give an honest review.



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Guys! I read so many books in January
! It was a great reading month for me and now I will share it with you. Check it out if you want to and let me know what you think!