Book Review: From Foster Care to Millionaire

What’s up bookworms? Have you been reading lots? I know that I sure have. This recent read of mine was called From Foster Care to Millionaire: A Young Entrepreneur’s Story of Tragedy and Triumph by Cody Maclain.

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Synopsis: Cody’s story offers all the components you’d expect from the success story of a young entrepreneur with Aspergers-motivation, drive, perseverance, focus, and passion. You might call it a rags-to-riches tale, and you wouldn’t be wrong. But that here-to-there narrative is only the top layer. Cody’s story unfolds to reveal a narrative that is more complicated and yet simpler, more central, to the human experience. What remains is the story of a boy, burdened like all of us with deep wounds and great gifts, searching for a purpose. What remains is a story that will inspire readers to find their true calling and work like hell to achieve their dreams.

Would you call this a memoir if the person is still alive? An autobiography? Well, this was a book about Cody Mclain’s life and it was an interesting journey.

I liked being able to see how he viewed the world and was very analytical at times and realistic at others. I have to give him props for starting a business when he was 14. That takes a lot of guts and time/commitment and he was successful in his efforts.

I believe that the title is a little misleading because he only really stays in foster care for a short time but it did show his development as he was hit with hardship after hardship throughout his life. There were so many people that he encountered and they all had integral parts in the building of his character.

He also had a dog named Max which was cool because that is what my dog’s name is! And his Max sounds just like my Max when he was younger.

The book was good. There were definitely parts where I felt like they could have been a little shorter but it all adds up and tells the story of his life and how he achieved success. He has all the skills of an entrepreneur and taught himself everything he knows.

I would recommend this book to anyone that wants to read about what it takes to not give up and follow your dreams (aka do what you want to do in life).

Book Rating: 3.5/5

You can buy this book on Amazon and Book Depository and find it on Goodreads.

Disclaimer: This book was sent to me by the author in ebook format to read and give an honest review. 


I made my latest TBR video where I talk about all the books I will be reading in June and the buddy reads I will be taking part in. The new TBR jar also commences its journey with me.

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Author Spotlight: Albert Nasib Badre

Albert Nasib Badre’s

WOW! WOMEN ON WRITING TOUR

OF

Looking West;

The Journey of a Lebanese-American Immigrant

Tour Begins April 8th2019

 Looking West Cover

  • Paperback: 267 pages
  • Publisher: WidO Publishing
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B07N6LR52T
  • ISBN: 9781947966130

Amazon Link:  https://www.amazon.com/Looking-West-Journey-Lebanese-American-Immigrant-ebook/dp/B07N6LR52T/?tag=wowwomenonwri-20

About the Book

In 1960, the Badre family emigrates from Beirut, Lebanon to the United States, a dream come true for fourteen-year-old Nasib.

Nasib struggles to assimilate as a teen in Albany, New York. With limited English skills, he attempts to learn new customs, make friends, and adapt to a different culture. In Beirut, the Badre family was well-known and socially privileged. In America, they are unknown nobodies. Nasib adopts his father’s name “Albert,” and to further Americanize his name, young Albert becomes “Al.”

Despite the many frustrations and difficulties, Al’s ultimate goal is to become a successful American. The new anonymity actually inspires the young man. Excited by the opportunities available to him in his new country, he determines to make a potent contribution to society.

As he strives to adapt, Al reads voraciously, becoming increasingly interested in religion and philosophy. Books become his “American friends,” and reading soon prompts him to ask deep theological questions about his family’s Lebanese Protestant roots, his mother’s conversion to Catholicism, and the contrast between the Protestant and Catholic faiths. This ultimately leads to his Catholic conversion.

Al’s search for meaning in life leads him to social activism among New York City’s poorest. And, in time, to graduate studies, where his desire is to improve the human condition through information technology.

Al Badre– like many other American immigrants–works his way through hardship to achieve a meaningful place in his adopted nation.

Rhode Island Family Photography, RI Family Photography, Dimery Photography

About the Author:  

Albert Nasib Badre is an American author born in Beirut Lebanon. He immigrated to the United States with his family in 1960 at the age of fourteen. His family made Albany, N.Y. their first home in America where he attended a private Catholic high school through his Junior year. After three years in Albany, the family moved to Iowa City, Iowa, when his father accepted a professor position at the University of Iowa. He finished his senior year at Iowa City High School, then went on to the University of Iowa where he got a Bachelor of Arts in Religious Studies.  After college, he spent a year as a social worker in New York City. Deciding social work was not for him, he went on to pursue graduate studies at the University of Michigan where he got his Ph.D. in 1973.

He spent the next thirty years at the Georgia Institute of Technology, and today he’s Professor Emeritus of Computing. During his tenure at Georgia Tech, he was an international consultant specializing in designing technology to enhance the human experience.  Dr. Badre was an early pioneer in the field of human-centric design, with some thirty years of experience in human-computer interaction, learning technologies, and human-centric e-learning. His background combines expertise in the empirical methodologies of the behavioral sciences and the design approaches of the computing sciences.

Dr. Badre authored numerous technical papers, is co-editor of the book Directions in Human Computer Interaction, and the author of the book, Shaping Web Usability: Interaction Design in Context, which was adopted in several dozen courses worldwide. His memoirs, Looking West, is the story of his coming of age immigration to America and subsequent conversion to the Catholic Church.

Today, Dr. Badre and his wife live in Providence, R.I., near his son and family, where he leads a very active volunteer life, in service to the community.

Find Albert Online:

Goodreads:  https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/197752.Albert_N_Badre

Twitter: https://twitter.com/anbadre

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/anbadre/

Website:https://www.badremusings.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=12819942



Blog Tour Dates

Launch Day – April 8th

Albert Nasib Badre launches his tour of “Looking West; The Journey of a Lebanese-American Immigrant” with an interview and giveaway at the Muffin!

April 11th @ World of My Imagination with Nicole Pyles

Nicole Pyles shares her review of “Looking West; The Journey of a Lebanese-American Immigrant” with readers at World of My Imagination. Don’t miss a chance to learn more about this heroic memoir.

https://theworldofmyimagination.blogspot.com/

April 12th @ Bring on Lemons with Crystal Otto

Crystal Otto shares a 5 star review or the touching and empowering memoir “Looking West” by Albert Nasib Badre.

http://bringonlemons.blogspot.com/

April 15th @ Selling Books with Cathy Stucker

Cathy Stucker interview Albert Nasib Badre about his empowering memoir “Looking West; The Journey of a Lebanese-American Immigrant”. Readers at Selling Books are looking forward to learning more about this touching journey.

https://www.sellingbooks.com/

April 16th @ To Write or Not to Write with Sreevarsha Sreejith 

Sreevarsha Sreejith reviews “Looking West” by Albert Nasib Badre. Don’t miss this opportunity to hear from Sreevarsha and visit To Write or Not to Write.
http://sreevarshasreejith.blogspot.com/

 

April 16th @ Lisa Haselton Reviews and Interview

Don’t miss today’s empowering and honest interview between Lisa Haselton and Albert Nasib Badre – you will want to learn more about “Looking West; The Journey of a Lebanese-American Immigrant” in this touching memoir.

http://lisahaseltonsreviewsandinterviews.blogspot.com/

 

April 17th @ Linda Appleman Shapiro

Well known book reviewer and fellow memoirist Linda Appleman Shapiro reviews “Looking West; The Journey of a Lebanese-American Immigrant” by Albert Nasib Badre.

http://applemanshapiro.com/category/book-reviews/

April 19th @ Memoir Revolution with Jerry Waxler

Jerry Waxler thoroughly enjoyed reader “Looking West; The Journey of a Lebanese-American Immigrant” by Albert Nasib Badre and shares his thoughts with readers at Memoir Revolution. Don’t miss this insightful review of Badre’s touching memoir.

https://memorywritersnetwork.com/blog/

April 22nd @ Author Anthony Avina

Author Anthony Avina delights readers at his blog as he reviews the moving memoir “Looking West” by Albert Nasib Badre.

https://authoranthonyavinablog.com/

April 23rd @ Beverley A. Baird

Beverley A. Baird reviews the memoir “Looking West; The Journey of a Lebanese-American Immigrant” by Albert Nasib Badre.

https://beverleyabaird.wordpress.com/

April 26th @ Breakeven Books

Today’s author spotlight at Breakeven Books is none other than memoirist and immigrant Albert Nasib Badre with his touching story “Looking West; The Journey of a Lebanese-American Immigrant”. Don’t miss this opportunity to learn more about this inspirational coming of age memoir.

https://breakevenbooks.com/

April 29th @ Coffee with Lacey

Lacey reviews “Looking West” by Albert Nasib Badre – readers at Coffee with Lacey will delight in this beautiful coming of age memoir and one man’s journey as a Lebanese-American immigrant.

https://coffeewithlacey.com/ 

April 30th @ Choices by Madeline Sharples

Today’s guest post titled “The Backstory: Letters, Photos, and Conversations” is penned by Albert Nasib Badre. Don’t miss this great post and opportunity to learn about Badre’s memoir “Looking West; The Journey of a Lebanese-American Immigrant”

http://madelinesharples.com/

May 1st @ Lisa M. Buske

Description: Fellow author Lisa M. Buske reviews the inspirational and touching memoir Looking West by Albert Nasib Badre. Don’t miss this opportunity to hear Lisa’s thoughts on this powerful story.

http://www.lisambuske.com/blog

 May 7th @ Bring on Lemons with Karen Levy

Israeli-American author Karen Levy reviews “Looking West; The Journey of a Lebanese-American Immigrant” by Albert Nasib Badre.

http://bringonlemons.blogspot.com/


Is anyone taking part in the Harry Potter Magical Readathon? Here is my video showing the books I chose to read for my OWLS! Let me know in the comments if you are participating.

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Book Review: Factfulness – Ten Reasons We’re Wrong About the World

Sara sent me a great review of a book she read. It wasn’t on our TBR but it was her little side project and clearly, she loved this book. Take a look at her review below.

*Sidenote: If you are looking for Christmas presents for someone, Sara makes these adorable little craft creatures. Check out her Etsy Shop to see what she has. I know the Potterheads will love her little creations.*

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Synopsis: When asked simple questions about global trends—what percentage of the world’s population live in poverty; why the world’s population is increasing; how many girls finish school—we systematically get the answers wrong. So wrong that a chimpanzee choosing answers at random will consistently outguess teachers, journalists, Nobel laureates, and investment bankers.

In Factfulness, Professor of International Health and global TED phenomenon Hans Rosling, together with his two long-time collaborators, Anna and Ola, offers a radical new explanation of why this happens. They reveal the ten instincts that distort our perspective—from our tendency to divide the world into two camps (usually some version of us and them) to the way we consume media (where fear rules) to how we perceive progress (believing that most things are getting worse).

Our problem is that we don’t know what we don’t know, and even our guesses are informed by unconscious and predictable biases.

It turns out that the world, for all its imperfections, is in a much better state than we might think. That doesn’t mean there aren’t real concerns. But when we worry about everything all the time instead of embracing a worldview based on facts, we can lose our ability to focus on the things that threaten us most.

Inspiring and revelatory, filled with lively anecdotes and moving stories, Factfulness is an urgent and essential book that will change the way you see the world and empower you to respond to the crises and opportunities of the future.

I think the best summary of this book is one of the final paragraphs in the book:
“I don’t tell you not to worry. I tell you to worry about the right things. I don’t tell you to look away from the news or to ignore the activists’ calls to action. I tell you to ignore the noise, but keep an eye on the big global risks. I don’t tell you not to be afraid. I tell you to stay coolheaded and support the global collaborations we need to reduce these risks. Control your urgency instinct. Control all your dramatic instincts. Be less stressed by the imaginary problems of an overdramatic world, and more alert to the real problems and how to solve them.”

This book is amazing. Everyone should read it – and I don’t ever even read non-fiction!
This book explains why the world is better off than we think, and what some of our major misperceptions are. The impressive thing, though, is that this is explained in an entertaining, and easy to understand way. It’s a quick, easy read, that thoroughly and simply explains major misperceptions we ALL have about the world, and where our focus actually should be – while still being backed up by plenty of easy-to-follow evidence.

Seriously. Read this book. It’s an easy read and helps you realize that things aren’t as bad as we think, and where we should actually be directing our efforts to improve the world. Read this book. Buy this book for someone.

Book Rating: 5/5

You can find this book on Amazon and Goodreads.

Disclaimer: This book was an extra read that Sara took on to for a fun side project. It was not asked of her to review it. She just chose to.


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Book Review: Trailer Trash – An 80’s Memoir

New book review up on the blog. This one is called Trailer Trash – An 80’s Memoir by Angie Cavallari.

Synopsis: Trailer Trash tells the story of Angie Cavallari, your typical girl growing up in the 1980s who finds herself cradled in an arm of a society that would be considered anything but your paradigmatic suburban neighborhood.

In 1980, Angie and her two siblings are dropped into a world of the poorest tenements during a decade where material wealth was worshipped. But these are not your usual run-of-the-mill Florida retirement occupants—these are tenants with issues that Angie soon realizes are the same that can happen anywhere—even under her own roof.

Her place in society is further confused by the fact that she doesn’t live in a trailer but nonetheless, shares a postage-sized backyard with a less-desired community by societal standards and attends a prestigious private school more than 45 minutes from her cinderblock castle.

After spending a decade living in a world of indiscernible differences, Angie’s family decides it’s time to pull up stakes, sell the trailer park and buy a double-wide trailer of their own in the Carnie Capital of World, Gibsonton, Florida.

Funny at times, nostalgic throughout, Trailer Trash hits on some serious notes and undertones about societal differences and the trials of surviving childhood in any decade and any environment.

I really enjoyed this book. The writer tells the story of her life with such ease and humor. It was very easy to read and cool to see how she grew up. I never knew what it was like to live in a trailer park but now I have some insight into it.

The author seemed to have a lot of guilt pushed on her about her weight as a child and that saddens me to know that her mother would make her feel like she had to look a certain way. We all have those relationships with our parents that regardless of how they unfold, tend to mold us into who we are today. If you read my last review for Fat Girl on a Plane, I talk a bit more about body weight issues and how we need to make ourselves feel empowered in our own skin.

At one point she talks about wolf spiders and if I was in that trailer where they were, I would be sleeping in a sealed tent outside. No way in hell would I be anywhere near those things…

My favorite character would probably have to be her grandmother. She could be a hardass at times but she seemed like a very fun woman. I don’t want to give too much away so I will stop there.

I would recommend this book to anyone who wants some light reading and to have a laugh. Angie will keep you smiling as you read how she took on life as a child and young adult in the world of trailer parks and all the fun/interesting people that come with them.

Book Rating: 4/5

You can find this book on Amazon or Goodreads or connect with the author on Twitter 🙂

Disclaimer: This book was sent to us in physical format to read and give an honest review.

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