Book Review: Sculpt Yourself

I read a book by a YouTuber! Yes, my friend Savy Leiser wrote a book called Sculpt Yourself and it was the last book I read to complete my NEWTS during the magical readathon! Man oh man can this girl write!

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Synopsis: LIPAMORPH is the drug that lets you sculpt yourself. It’s how so many female celebrities in the mid-2010s remained so thin while having such large butts. It loosens up the fat in your body, allowing you to choose your own proportions. And it’s just been legalized for sale in Chicago.

AMBER is a 24-year-old tech support worker by day, gay feminist blogger (and bad-sitcom aficionado) by night. She’s been vocal about her disapproval of Lipamorph from the beginning, seeing it as another tool to reinforce patriarchal beauty standards; but as Lipamorph becomes more common, Amber’s dissenting voice starts to matter less and less.

JUDIE is Amber’s younger sister, and seemingly her complete opposite; she loves pop music, pretty latte art, and dating men. After struggling with hating her body for most of her life, Judie has become borderline reliant on Lipamorph for self-confidence, much to Amber’s dismay.

KELLY is an artist currently working for the marketing firm on the floor above Amber’s office. She’s whip-smart, proudly bisexual, and strikingly beautiful…and she’s the woman Amber’s fallen in love with.

I liked this book quite a bit. Savy has this way of writing dialogue that just flows so well. She can carry a story on dialogue alone because all of her characters interacted in fun and exciting ways. They all had different ways of dealing with their personal issues and that is why it was nice that she split the story into different perspectives so you got to understand where everyone was coming from when they had their opinions.

The Lipamorph drug was cool. Who would have thought up a drug that lets you mold your body ft around your body to wherever you want it. I can definitely see this being a dangerous thing if it were real. All the characters had very different opinions on it and it was very enlightening to see some fight against it while others embraced it.

I love that there is so much LBGTQ+ rep in this book. It is seen in a positive light too because it shows some unhealthy relationships and talks about certain expectations that people in the community sometimes have to deal with that can get overlooked very easily.

I love the whole “Fight the system” vibe Amber brings to the table. She really fights for what she believes in and cares about people.

Plus, there are so many fun foods that the characters eat that I have never tried before but am curious to now (like BBQ nachos).

Overall, it was an entertaining book with what I believe was a positive message and you should give it a try!

Book Rating: 3.5/5

You can buy this book on Amazon and find it on Goodreads!

Disclaimer: I was given a free ebook from the author to read and give my honest review.


I finally finished the NEWTS and did my wrap up where I discussed all the books I read over the month of August (spoiler: I read 9 books).

ACTUAL NATURAL HEALTH & WELLNESS PRODUCTS, INC.

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Book Review: Songs from Richmond Avenue

Book reviews, for the win! We have another here at Breakeven Books for a book called Songs from Richmond Avenue by Michael Reed. This book is summed up as a Houston love story with beer and a couple of dead folks thrown in.

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Pages: 181

Synopsis: If the adage “nothing civilized ever resulted from the drinking of beer” requires further proof, one needs to look no farther than down Houston’s pothole-infested Richmond Avenue. There, the blurry-eyed denizens of the Relix Club while away the hours engaged in their two favorite activities – drinking and betting.

Until recently that was good enough for our storyteller, a journalist of questionable work ethic, who undergoes an epiphany following a bus stop meeting with pretty Michelle, a woman he declares has “skin so perfect I doubted she even had pores.”

Could she be his redemption? Maybe, but first, he’d better contend with her baseball bat-wielding former beau, her nihilistic stripper roommate and the suspicious death of a friend, who fancies himself the father of Brute Generation poetry.

Mostly satire, often wildly unpredictable, the only real long shot in Songs From Richmond Avenue would be for its protagonist to put down his beer long enough to learn anything of true value.

This book was interesting. The writing style itself feels like the story is told through the blurred vision of the main character. It’s a blurred vision because the main character is drinking pretty much the entire book. And boy can he drink.

I didn’t find that there was much of a story to the book; it just felt like we were taking a peek into the main characters life for a day or two. None the less, it was entertaining to read and I enjoyed the new writing style that I am not used to.

My favorite character was probably Honey because she didn’t give a shit and just said whatever she wanted to whomever she wanted. I also really liked Strummer, the very chill dog that just wanted to have a home.

That being said, I did get a little bored reading this book. It wasn’t one that I couldn’t put down. I did put it down many times to go do other things but I am glad I finished it because I liked the ending to it.

If you are looking for a book that is a nice break from a long series or just an in-between book, then this is a good one. It’s not that long and will give you a laugh.

You can find the book on Amazon!

Book rating: 3/5

Disclaimer: This book was sent to me in physical format to read and give an honest review. 


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